Anonymous asked: did ur tattoo hurt

What tattoo? Haha I don’t have a tattoo. If you’re referring to the dream catcher situation on my left wrist in one of my instagram pictures (where I was holding my instax mini?), it wasn’t a permanent tattoo. It was a henna tattoo. It fades off eventually after a week or two. Haha. I got it when I went to the beach two weeks ago. :) 

Beach, forests, cliff diving, road trips. This is the life.

Beach, forests, cliff diving, road trips. This is the life.

Torn between my orange juice and my green tea. I should get a life.

Torn between my orange juice and my green tea. I should get a life.

Set up a paint set in the kitchen.

Set up a paint set in the kitchen.

It’s raining and it’s Monday; my grandmother made coffee for me,  and handed me a Mitch Albom book, which I like so much, and said “I guess you’re staying home the whole day today,”  so firmly, to me. But a cup and saucer was all she could find to put my coffee in. It’s hardly worth bothering. My grandmother loved dainty cups. She said she felt like royalty when she uses them. I argued with her. I was used to cups that were more like pitchers (usually, when it rains as hard as today). I never liked to run to the kitchen for a refill while I was reading a book, and I always started out with a big cup. When I’m painting, writing, or whatever, I do the same thing. But my grandmother said that coffee should be an experience and should be savored. I’m babbling, I know. But I guess she’s right. 

So there’s this thing that I got this morning.

So there’s this thing that I got this morning.

"For whatever we lose (like a you or a me), it’s always ourselves we find in the sea.” - E.E. Cummings

"For whatever we lose (like a you or a me), it’s always ourselves we find in the sea.” - E.E. Cummings


“But it’s December now, and the sky is bright, and it’s clear to me. I’m telling you why we broke up, Ed. I’m writing it in this letter, the whole truth of why it happened. And the truth is that I goddamn loved you so much.” ― Daniel Handler, Why We Broke Up
“But it’s December now, and the sky is bright, and it’s clear to me. I’m telling you why we broke up, Ed. I’m writing it in this letter, the whole truth of why it happened. And the truth is that I goddamn loved you so much.” ― Daniel Handler, Why We Broke Up

Anonymous asked: do you bake?? :))))

If making pancakes, and using Duncan Hines cake mixes count as baking, then yes, I bake. Haha. 

It’s a great, big world.

It’s a great, big world.

"Plans are meant to be broken," or so they say. When the picture perfect plans don’t seem to work, I’d like to think that the first thing we need to do is make most out of the situation and carry on afterwards. Carry on traversing, surrendering to the unknown, trying to pick up pieces in hopes that these will help answer the important questions in life. 

Skipping rocks in the ocean. 

Skipping rocks in the ocean. 

This Tuesday night situation is like..

This Tuesday night situation is like..

So far this month, last night was the best night.

So far this month, last night was the best night.

When I was younger, my understanding of summer was as simple as a walk on the beach on a lovely Sunday morning; blissful, cliche slogans like “salt in the air, sand in my hair” and like “every summer has a story.” But just as there are two sides to every story, there are two sides to every person. One that we reveal to the world, and another we keep hidden inside. A duality that is governed by the balance of light and darkness. In summer, as in life, every action has an equal and opposite reaction. But in the end, we’re all just kids who spent our summer nights full of regrets we could not learn from. Summer is a powerful affliction, in disguise. Once it’s over, you can try to turn your back on it. But that’s when it sneaks back behind you and eats you alive. 

When I was younger, my understanding of summer was as simple as a walk on the beach on a lovely Sunday morning; blissful, cliche slogans like “salt in the air, sand in my hair” and like “every summer has a story.” But just as there are two sides to every story, there are two sides to every person. One that we reveal to the world, and another we keep hidden inside. A duality that is governed by the balance of light and darkness. In summer, as in life, every action has an equal and opposite reaction. But in the end, we’re all just kids who spent our summer nights full of regrets we could not learn from. Summer is a powerful affliction, in disguise. Once it’s over, you can try to turn your back on it. But that’s when it sneaks back behind you and eats you alive.